Eder Kemo

When I was younger I used to swim with friends in one of the several rivers that cut through my village. There was one area where the water was deep and secluded under trees which we used to frequent. My first time jumping in there I was not expecting the temperature of the water to be so cold, the initial shock after jumping in robbed me of my breath and I struggled to stay above the surface.

Stepping from Gira to Kemo reminded me of that moment in my life, the difference being the temperatures were not as extreme in difference like the water was and as I stepped upon Kemo I wasn’t gripped by panic and concerns of drowning.

I’m not sure why Kemo became of particular interest to me. Perhaps it was the sense of mystery that emanated from documents and photos brought back to the surface by others. I had heard whispers of a door with an engraving upon it a door within which Phil Henderson eventually vanished behind, of strange pictoglyphs strewn upon the walls of the Age.

By my estimation I had managed to map about 90% of the Age from the photographs relayed to the surface, but I was aware I was missing the key point of how the three areas I had mapped linked together. Now I have the chance to complete my work and study the glyphs I had only seen from a distance in photographs before.

The Link in point was a small pagoda of sorts which lead out over a rocky arch of a bridge. Below was the pond, an area I had seen before from photographs and one of the areas I had previously mapped. The bridge lead over to a path that cut between the eroded rock, as I crossed I noticed large black bug like creatures hanging from the top of the rock wall digging away at the surface and eating something by the look of it.

The path eventually opened up into an area I had deemed “area one” during my previous mapping attempts. A pleasant grassy area with long thin trees with pancake like foliage, smooth pebble like rocks, and what looked like bamboo. The dirt path I stood upon lead down to a stone path which curved to the left out of view. Straight ahead of me was the infamous door. The path also curved to the right where it arched around the area, passing a gazebo before reaching some steps that lead to the fountain and an area with lots of pictoglyphs.

I cannot deny, the draw to those glyphs was strong. But the door…I had to see it first, if only for a moment.

The door was a little more elaborate than the counterpart found at the Cleft with an elegant carved boarder surrounding the same spiral hand symbol I had been finding everywhere. I reached out, my fingers touching the cool surface of the door, tracing the embossed edges of that hand symbol. Touching the door revealed nothing, but that did not surprise me. In fact I am starting to form an idea on how the door is opened. If it is anything like the one back at the Cleft then I will need to hunt down seven cloths.

The area next to the door revealed more of the pictoglyphs that littered the Age. It also served to show me how areas one and three from my mapping were linked, or areas one and two as I have now correctly labeled them.

Eder Kemo

My interest in the door had be fed, for a spell. I shall turn my attention back to it when I further investigate how to open it. In the mean time I felt the glyphs warranted further study so I made my way back to the fountain area.
The glyphs in this area seem to represent some of the other Ages. Indeed I am pretty sure one of them is Kadish Tolesa, and there is one that looks like Gahreesen and another that looks like Teledahn. I cannot fathom as of yet what story these glyphs are trying to tell, who are the figures?

I decided to spend the rest of the day chronicling the glyphs, drawing them in my journal and taking photos of them and noting down their locations and any other details about them that could be helpful in the future.

I feel like there is a larger story to be told by these images, I had felt overly drawn to the Age from the moment I first heard of the “Garden Age”.

Chief amongst my many questions is…Who drew them?

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